Oliver Kelley Farm

Contact: 

Lauren Peck, 651-259-3137, lauren.peck@mnhs.org
Jessica Kohen, 651-259-3148, jessica.kohen@mnhs.org

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Lead Release

Revitalized Kelley Farm Tells Story of Farming From Yesterday to Today

For immediate release

Release dated: 
February 15, 2017
Media contacts: 

Lauren Peck, 651-259-3137, lauren.peck@mnhs.org
Jessica Kohen, 651-259-3148, jessica.kohen@mnhs.org

Revitalized Kelley Farm Tells Story of Farming From Yesterday to Today

New visitor center, outdoor exhibits and programming open to the public this spring

The Oliver Kelley Farm opens weekends in April and May, following a multimillion dollar renovation, and features new spaces and expanded programming that tell a broader story of agricultural history, spanning from the 1860s to modern day.

A new visitor center offers three times as much space as the previous one—with a learning kitchen, classrooms, indoor exhibits, museum store and updated guest amenities—for the farm’s growing attendance. In the new Farm Lab area, visitors can explore today’s agriculture through modern cropland, animals, gardens and an outdoor exhibit trail. Then head to Oliver Kelley’s historic 1860s farmstead, a National Historic Landmark, to compare how Minnesota’s agriculture has grown and changed over 150 years.

Visitors will be able to engage with not only the history of agriculture but where their food comes from today during expanded programming and special events, new workshops and field trip offerings throughout the year.

Melanie Adams, senior director of Guest Experience and Educational Services at MNHS, says, “We can’t wait to welcome visitors to the newly revitalized Oliver Kelley Farm. Our new Farm Lab area perfectly complements the Historic Farmstead, and the site now gives our growing number of visitors a fuller picture of Minnesota agriculture, both past and present.”

The farm opens for the season April 1 with expanded hours, Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Oliver Kelley Farm will hold a Grand Opening Celebration May 6 and 7 with music, chef demos, food and more to officially welcome visitors to the revitalized farm. The site also offers expanded summer hours, opening Tuesday-Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., starting Memorial Day Weekend through Labor Day.

About the Oliver Kelley Farm
Oliver Kelley and his family began farming on the banks of the Mississippi in 1850. He went on to found the first successful national farming organization, the National Grange of the Order of the Patrons of Husbandry, better known as the Grange, in 1867. Today the Oliver Kelley Farm is recognized as a National Historic Landmark and “the birthplace of organized agriculture in America.” At the site, visitors can explore agricultural history from the 1860s to modern day through machinery, cropland, animals and more.

The farm is located at 15788 Kelley Farm Rd., 2.5 miles southeast of downtown Elk River on U.S. Hwy. 10. For more information, call 763-441-6896 or visit www.mnhs.org/kelleyfarm.

The Minnesota Historical Society is a non-profit educational and cultural institution established in 1849. MNHS collects, preserves and tells the story of Minnesota’s past through museum exhibits, libraries and collections, historic sites, educational programs and book publishing. Using the power of history to transform lives, MNHS preserves our past, shares our state’s stories and connects people with history.

The Minnesota Historical Society is supported in part by its Premier Partners: Xcel Energy and Explore Minnesota Tourism.

Program Spaces

Oliver Kelley Farm Program Spaces

For immediate release

Release dated: 
February 15, 2017
Media contacts: 

Lauren Peck, 651-259-3137, lauren.peck@mnhs.org
Jessica Kohen, 651-259-3148, jessica.kohen@mnhs.org

Oliver Kelley Farm Program Spaces

At the revitalized Oliver Kelley Farm, visitors can now explore agriculture from the 1860s to today in three spaces: the Visitor Center, Farm Lab and Historic Farmstead.

VISITOR CENTER 
The place where every visitor, from families to field trip students, will begin their visit, including classrooms with modern technology, a learning kitchen, community meeting room, museum store and indoor exhibits.

Efforts have been made to make the building sustainable and environmentally friendly, and Gold LEED certification is expected. Highlights of the project include geothermal heating, construction material sourced from within 500 miles, and all wood sustainably grown, harvested and transported.

Learning Kitchen
A state-of-the-art teaching kitchen to get hands-on experience on how today’s food gets from farm to table in demonstrations and special workshops.



FARM LAB
At the Farm Lab, guests can engage with a variety of outdoor spaces to discover Minnesota’s modern agriculture through livestock, gardening, crops, machinery and more.

The Farm Lab includes:

Farm Lab Garden
Explore a wide variety of fruits and vegetables that grow in Minnesota today, like beans, tomatoes and squash, and discover new hybrids and varieties that have developed since Kelley’s time. This space will also showcase different theme gardens annually, beginning with a World War I-era garden in 2017.

Farm Lab Crops
Explore nearly 10 acres of crops, such as sugar beets, corn and soybeans, and learn about their roles in modern Minnesota agriculture.

Farm Lab Barn 
While heritage breed animals—those that Kelley raised in the 1860s—call the Historic Farmstead home, here visitors can learn about modern-day farm animals.

Food Trail
Follow this outdoor exhibit trail and engage with five interactive stations on protein, dairy, vegetables, fruit and grain.

Kelley Annex (pictured on left) 
A flexible, four-season space that can be used for everything from a field trip lunchroom to programming to rental use.


HISTORIC FARMSTEAD
Visitors can learn about Oliver Kelley’s role as an agricultural innovator and explore the Kelleys’ lives on this 1860s working farm.

Historic Farmhouse
Learn about the Kelleys’ 1876 home, try 19th century chores and venture down into the root cellar, the oldest original structure on the farm.

Barn
Explore upstairs in the barn to find the grain and hay that will feed animals year-round, then head downstairs to see where the cattle and horses eat.

Kitchen Garden
Help tend vegetables, fruit and flowers that were grown over 150 years ago on this one-acre garden.

Fields
Discover historic crops that the Kelleys cultivated in the 1860s, like sorghum, corn and oats.

Animal Pens
Meet heritage breeds of animals that the Kelleys raised, including Berkshire hogs and Southdown sheep.

Food Trail

Oliver Kelley Farm Exhibit Trail

For immediate release

Release dated: 
February 15, 2017
Media contacts: 

Lauren Peck, 651-259-3137, lauren.peck@mnhs.org
Jessica Kohen, 651-259-3148, jessica.kohen@mnhs.org

Oliver Kelley Farm Exhibit Trail

On the new Food Trail, visitors can learn where their food comes from by walking this 0.1 mile route and experiencing interactive stations along the way. Five exhibit stations examine the food groups—protein, dairy, fruit, vegetables, grain—that make up the USDA’s MyPlate program through interactive activities and graphics at each stop.

The content is perfect for school groups and families with children age 4-10 to learn how food gets from the farm to the dinner table.

The five stations are:

Protein 
Open up a model hog to learn where different cuts of pork come from and discover how protein can be found in both animals and plants.

Dairy
Try “milking” a cow with a modern milking machine or by hand. Then learn how milk can be used to make everything from cheese to ice cream.

Fruit
Use an apple sorting machine to separate the fruit by size. See how apples and other fruits grow in Minnesota.

Vegetables
Gather a variety of vegetables that grow everywhere from bushes and vines to underground and learn to identify the parts of plants we eat.

Grain
Complete a puzzle to see how different grains are used, then spin a zoetrope to see grain production come to life.                                   

Spring on the Farm

Spring on the Oliver Kelley Farm

For immediate release

Release dated: 
February 15, 2017
Media contacts: 

Lauren Peck, 651-259-3137, lauren.peck@mnhs.org
Jessica Kohen, 651-259-3148, jessica.kohen@mnhs.org

Spring on the Oliver Kelley Farm

As the Oliver Kelley Farm kicks off its open season in April and May, visitors can experience the goings-on of spring on a working farm. Help plant gardens, tend growing crops and meet newborn animals on the historic farm and in the new Farm Lab.

Spring events and programs include:

  • Plan Your Garden for Seed Saving Workshop: March 11, 9 a.m.-Noon, $15/$13 MNHS members
    Create a garden plan and learn techniques for seed-saving from year to year.
  • Seed Savers Exchange: March 12, 2-4 p.m., Free
    At this annual event, discover rare and heirloom seeds, learn from a gardening expert and take home seeds to plant.
  • Egg-Stravaganza Cooking Workshop: April 8, 9-11 a.m., $18/$16 MNHS members
    Head to the Learning Kitchen for a hands-on workshop on new and unique ways to use hard-boiled eggs.
  • Bird House Building Workshop: April 8, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., $5 with regular admission
    Drop in and craft a home for birds, which aid farmers in insect control and pollination.
  • Grand Opening Celebration: May 6 & 7, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Free with regular admission
    A weekend officially opening the farm’s newest spaces with guest chef demos, live music, food and much more.
  • Mother’s Day Weekend: May 13 & 14, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Free with regular admission
    Spend a weekend exploring spring on the farm from the 1860s to today. Mothers are admitted free when accompanied by a child.
Summer on the Farm

Summer on the Oliver Kelley Farm

For immediate release

Release dated: 
February 15, 2017
Media contacts: 

Lauren Peck, 651-259-3137, lauren.peck@mnhs.org
Jessica Kohen, 651-259-3148, jessica.kohen@mnhs.org

Summer on the Oliver Kelley Farm

As school goes on break, the Oliver Kelley Farm is the perfect family destination all summer long with plenty of outdoor fun and room to run. Help tend growing crops, learn about heritage and modern breeds of pigs, cows and sheep, and bring in the summer harvest from the gardens and fields.

Summer events and programs are free with regular site admission and include: 

  • Farm Animal Weekend: June 3 & 4, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 
    Learn about animals’ roles in 19th century farming and today’s agriculture, including meeting heritage breed animals at the historic farm and modern livestock at the Farm Lab Barn.
  • Father’s Day Weekend: June 17 & 18, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
    Spend a summer day exploring 1860s and modern-day agriculture. Fathers receive free admission when accompanied by a child.
  • Dairy Days: June 24 & 25, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
    Discover how farmers cared for dairy cows in the 1860s versus today and sample dairy products in the Historic Farmstead kitchen and new Learning Kitchen.
  • Farmer’s Fourth of July: July 4, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
    Celebrate Fourth of July 1860s style with speeches, games and more at the Historic Farmstead, then head to the Farm Lab for 21st century crafts, games and ice cream.
  • Children’s Farm Chore Challenge Day: July 22 & August 5, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
    In July, kids can learn about 19th century chores at the Historic Farmstead, then return in August to learn about how farm tasks are done in the 21st century.
  • The Useful Art of Pickling: August 12 & 13, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
    Try your hand at historic and modern pickling techniques in the Historic Farmstead kitchen and Learning Kitchen.
Fall & Winter on the Farm

Fall & Winter on the Oliver Kelley Farm

For immediate release

Release dated: 
February 15, 2017
Media contacts: 

Lauren Peck, 651-259-3137, lauren.peck@mnhs.org
Jessica Kohen, 651-259-3148, jessica.kohen@mnhs.org

Fall & Winter on the Oliver Kelley Farm

As fall arrives in Minnesota, visitors can celebrate the harvest season by helping bring in produce from the gardens and then heading to the kitchen to preserve food. Learn how the grain crop comes in from the fields and how the farm prepares for winter.

Fall and winter events and programs include: 

  • Threshers & Combines Weekend: September 2, 3 & 4, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free with regular admission
    Celebrate Labor Day weekend and help with the grain harvest using a historic horse-powered thresher and a modern combine.
  • Prairie Sugar & Sweets Weekend: September 30 & October 1, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free with regular admission
    Turn sorghum into molasses like farmers did 150 years ago, then learn about how modern sugar beet crops become sugar and sample a variety of sweet treats.
  • Harvest Days: October 19, 20, 21 & 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., free with regular admission
    Experience the end of the harvest season in a festive atmosphere with a quilting bee, crafting corn husk dolls, picking the last of the produce and more.
  • A Yankee Thanksgiving Tour: November 18 & 19, 1-4 p.m., $12/$10 MNHS members
    Learn about preparations for an 1860s Thanksgiving celebration at the Historic Farmstead.
  • Christmas on the Farm Tour: Dec. 9 & 10, 1-4 p.m., $12/$10 MNHS members
    Discover how the Kelleys celebrated the holidays, including an outdoor bonfire, bobsled rides (snow permitting!) and sweet treats.

Starting in November, Oliver Kelley Farm closes for the season, but keep an eye out for special events on the MNHS calendar during the winter months.

Field Trips

Oliver Kelley Farm Field Trips

For immediate release

Release dated: 
February 15, 2017
Media contacts: 

Lauren Peck, 651-259-3137, lauren.peck@mnhs.org
Jessica Kohen, 651-259-3148, jessica.kohen@mnhs.org

Oliver Kelley Farm Field Trips

In conjunction with this revitalization project, the Oliver Kelley Farm has developed four new multidisciplinary lessons for the school field trip audience in grades 3-12, increasing the total number of lessons offered to nine. The new lessons are tied to Minnesota state standards in social studies and STEM, and hands-on learning and expanded programming enable students to experience the broader story of agriculture, past and present.

The new field trip offerings are:

Agriculture is Everywhere 
Discover the myriad ways that agriculture touches all aspects of our lives. Students examine plants, animals and food produced in Minnesota as they map out the evolution of farms.

Northern Lights - Growing Minnesota
This curriculum-based program focuses on chapters 10-20 of MNHS’ “Northern Lights” textbook, and uses the thread of agriculture in Minnesota to explore technology, the environment and society as it has changed over time.

Minnesota Feeds the World
By 2050, it is projected that there will be at least nine billion people on earth. What role will Minnesota take in helping to make sure there is enough food? Through critical thinking and collaboration, students explore possible solutions to real-world problems related to feeding the world.

Farm to You
Agriculture plays a role in every aspect of our daily lives from basics like food, clothing and shelter to more complex elements such as healthcare, transportation and entertainment. Students learn that a career in agriculture can mean much more than farming.

How to Visit

How to Visit Oliver Kelley Farm

For immediate release

Release dated: 
February 15, 2017
Media contacts: 

Lauren Peck, 651-259-3137, lauren.peck@mnhs.org
Jessica Kohen, 651-259-3148, jessica.kohen@mnhs.org

How to Visit Oliver Kelley Farm

General Admission
$12 adults, $10 seniors, veterans/active military and college students, $6 ages 5-17, free age 4 and under and MNHS members

Dates and Hours

  • April and May: Open Saturdays and Sundays 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
  • Memorial Day Weekend (Saturday, May 27) through Labor Day (Monday, September 4): Open Tuesday-Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
  • September and October: Open Saturdays and Sundays 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
  • November and December: Closed except for special events
  • Open year-round for group tours with reservation

Website
www.mnhs.org/kelleyfarm

Address
15788 Kelley Farm Rd., Elk River, MN 55330

Parking
Free and available onsite, including new electrical vehicle charging stations.

Dining
No dining facilities are available on site, but family picnics are welcome and encouraged. A covered picnic shelter and outdoor tables are available.

WiFi
Free wireless Internet is available in the visitor center and Kelley Annex.

Funding & Partners

Oliver Kelley Farm Funding & Partners

For immediate release

Release dated: 
February 15, 2017
Media contacts: 

Lauren Peck, 651-259-3137, lauren.peck@mnhs.org
Jessica Kohen, 651-259-3148, jessica.kohen@mnhs.org

Oliver Kelley Farm Funding & Partners

This project was funded through a 2014 capital budget appropriation of $10.5 million from the state of Minnesota and more than $4 million in private support.

Agricultural Partners
The Minnesota Historical Society is grateful for the support of several agricultural partners who championed this revitalization project, including:

  • Midwest Dairy Association
  • Minnesota Agriculture in the Classroom
  • Minnesota Corn Growers Association
  • Minnesota Department of Agriculture
  • Minnesota Farm Bureau
  • Minnesota Farmers Union
  • Minnesota Soybean Growers Association
  • Minnesota Wheat Research & Promotion Council
  • Sugarbeet Research and Education Board of Minnesota and North Dakota

Private Donors 
MNHS appreciates the donors whose generosity allows us to welcome more Minnesotans to several new visitor center spaces, including:

  • Minnesota Farmer’s Hall, made possible by a gift from the Davis Family
  • The Learning Kitchen, made possible by a gift from the Page family
  • The Whitney and Elizabeth MacMillan Education Wing
  • Jim & Pam Deal Classroom
  • Land O’Lakes Classroom

“The Kelley Farm does a great job in telling the story of farming in Minnesota, which is key to our local and global economy. We want to help expand the story so everyone can learn where our food comes from and how Minnesota agriculture is making a difference.” –Whitney MacMillan

Brief History

Oliver Kelley Farm Brief History

For immediate release

Release dated: 
February 15, 2017
Media contacts: 

Lauren Peck, 651-259-3137, lauren.peck@mnhs.org
Jessica Kohen, 651-259-3148, jessica.kohen@mnhs.org

Oliver Kelley Farm Brief History

The Oliver Kelley Farm is a National Historic Landmark located along the Mississippi River in Elk River. It is the homestead of Oliver Kelley, founder of the first successful national farming organization, the Grange.

Oliver Hudson Kelley
Born in Boston, Kelley migrated west in 1849 at age 21. Kelley knew very little about farming when he staked his claim in the new town of Itasca on the Mississippi River, near present-day Elk River. Uncommon for the time, Kelley learned how to farm by reading agriculture journals, which often encouraged innovative farming techniques. Kelley’s farm quickly became a local showplace, and he encouraged other farmers to experiment with advanced methods and to share information.

While still farming, Kelley helped found the Territorial Agricultural Society in 1853, now the State Agricultural Society, the same group that puts on the Minnesota State Fair each August. He also helped found the Minnesota Fruit Growers Association in 1866, now the Minnesota State Horticultural Society.

The Grange
In 1864 Kelley took a position in Washington, D.C., working for the federal Bureau of Agriculture. Through his job, he advanced his idea of bringing farmers and their families together to share information to improve their communities. In 1867 along with seven others, he established the National Grange of the Order of the Patrons of Husbandry, better known as the Grange. The Grange became the first successful national farming organization. It was also the first national organization to include women as full voting members from its inception in 1867. The organization still exists today and celebrates the 150th anniversary of its founding in 2017.

The Later Years
Kelley went back and forth between Washington, D.C., and Minnesota for many years. The farm remained in the Kelley family until 1901. Oliver Kelley died in Washington, D.C., in 1913.

In 1935, the Grange purchased the farm and donated it to the Minnesota Historical Society in 1961 to preserve and tell the story of Oliver Kelley, Minnesota agriculture and the Grange. The farm has operated as a living history farm focused on 1860s agriculture since 1981.

Timeline

January 7, 1826 — Oliver Hudson Kelley is born on January 7, the fifth child of a Boston tailor.

1847 to 1848 — Kelley leaves home and travels to Chicago. He works briefly as a reporter with the Chicago Tribune and receives training to become a telegrapher.

April 29, 1849 — Oliver Kelley marries 18-year-old Lucy Earle from Chillecothe, Ohio. That summer, the Kelleys travel to the new territory of Minnesota with a letter of introduction to Governor Alexander Ramsey.

1850 — When one branch of the legislature proposes a bill making Itasca the capital of the territory, Kelley rushes to stake a land claim near the trading post. The bill doesn’t pass and the Kelleys move to the property and learn to farm. They build a small one-and-a-half-story house and the first frame barn north of Minneapolis. 

February 1851 — Lucy gives birth to a daughter, but dies two months later. Oliver's mother comes to care for the infant, but baby Lucy dies in early fall.

July 7, 1852 — Oliver Kelley marries Temperance Baldwin Lane, an Anoka schoolteacher, who also came to Minnesota from Boston.

June 12, 1854 — Oliver and Temperance have their first daughter, Julia Wilkin Kelley.

September 9, 1855 — Frances (Fanny) Louisa Kelley is born.

1856 — Kelley becomes postmaster, notary public and justice of the peace of Northwood. A hotel, general store, factory, and school are built.

1857 — The financial panic forces Kelley to relinquish his interest in Northwood, and the town quickly dies.

January 19, 1858 — Grace Hortense Kelley is born.

January 7, 1859 — Garaphelia Kelley is born.

1860 — Kelley switches to market gardening of fruits and vegetables to sell to urban areas.

August 1862 — The U.S.-Dakota War begins, and Kelley complains to Gov. Ramsey that passing U.S. soldiers seized his horses and wagon.

December 4, 1867 — Kelley and six others form the Order of the Patrons of Husbandry, also known as the Grange.

1868 — Temperance’s niece, Caroline Hall, becomes Oliver’s assistant and is in charge of the Grange’s organizational work. She demands that women should have an equal role in the Grange.

November 24, 1871 — Because Kelley couldn’t pay off his mortgage, the farm is foreclosed. The family moves to Washington, D.C., and he works full time as the secretary for the Grange.

1871 to 1874 — The popularity of the Grange grows exponentially across the nation. It succeeds in promoting legislation to regulate railroad rates and unfair weights and measures.

1873 — Kelley buys back the farm with some financial manipulation and help from relatives.

1875 — The Grange begins to decline in popularity. Kelley decides to return to the farm and rebuild a larger house to host his Grange office.

1875 to 1886 — His 21-year-old daughter, Julia, takes over the farm operation and expands it by 29 acres. With help from Fanny and hired hands, she runs the farm for the next 11 years. During the winter months, she joins her parents in Florida.

1878 — Kelley resigns from the Grange and founds a new city, Rio Carabelle, Florida. He serves as mayor, Franny as postmistress, and Grace as a schoolteacher.

1892 — The Grange recognizes Caroline Hall as “equal to a ‘Founder of the Order.’”

1901 — The Kelley family sells the farm and moves back to Washington, D.C. The farm passes through a series of private owners until 1935.

December 24, 1907 — Garaphelia Kelley dies.

1910 — The Kelley Farm is now referred to as “Riverside Farm” and is inhabited by Fred Clark, a friend and former neighbor of the Kelleys.

May 24, 1911 — Temperance Lane Kelley dies.

1913 — Shortly after his 87th birthday party, Oliver H. Kelley dies.

January 1, 1916 — Julia Wilkin Kelley dies.

December 11, 1917 — Caroline Hall dies.

September 6, 1923 — Grace Kelley dies.

September 12, 1925 — The family line ends when Frances Kelley passes away.

1935 — The National Grange obtains ownership of the farm. Efforts are made to repair the land and buildings. The Oliver H. Kelley Farm monument is constructed on Highway 10.

October 19 to 21, 1937 — The State Grange of Minnesota hosts the 65th Annual Convention at the farm.

1942 — The State Grange starts a youth camp at the Kelley Farm for young people to participate in instructional and recreational activities.

1954 — The National Grange opens the historic house to the public.

1962 — The National Grange transfers ownership of the Kelley Homestead to the Minnesota Historical Society.

July 19, 1964 — The Oliver Kelley Homestead is designated as a National Historic Landmark.

1975 — Restoration begins on the Kelley Farm. The barn, in bad condition, is completely reconstructed to the original style, with a few original beams and posts remaining.

1981 — A visitor center is built, and interpretive programming begins.

2015 to 2017 — The farm undergoes an expansion that includes a new visitor center and exhibits that tell a broader and more contemporary story of food and agriculture in Minnesota. This project was funded through a 2014 capital budget appropriation of $10.5 million from the state of Minnesota and private funding.

High-Res Images

Oliver Kelley Farm Images

Oliver Kelley Farm Images

The new and revitalized Oliver Kelley Farm spans a broad range of agriculture history. Visitors can explore 1860s farming on the Historic Farmstead, then head to the brand-new Farm Lab and visitor center (pictured) for the latest on today’s agriculture.

 

Minnesota Historical Society

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The new visitor center at the Oliver Kelley Farm 

Minnesota Historical Society

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The new Learning Kitchen in the visitor center

Minnesota Historical Society

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Visitors can tend modern Minnesota crops in the new Farm Lab Garden and explore the produce the Kelley family cultivated 150 years ago in the kitchen garden on his 1860s farmstead.

 

Minnesota Historical Society

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After exploring the new offerings at the Farm Lab and visitor center, visitors can learn about life on a Minnesota farm in the 1860s at the Historic Farmstead, including meeting the resident oxen.

Minnesota Historical Society

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Oliver H. Kelley, ca. 1875. Kelley staked a claim in present-day Elk River in the early 1850s and became a farmer who was eager to learn and experiment with new innovations. In 1867, he and seven others, founded the Order of the Patrons of Husbandry, better known as the Grange, the first national farming organization.

Minnesota Historical Society

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B-Roll Video
News Releases

April 19, 2017 Oliver Kelley Farm Offers Great Visuals During Grand Opening Celebration May 6 & 7
February 24, 2017 Oliver Kelley Farm Logos
February 15, 2017 Revitalized Kelley Farm Tells Story of Farming From Yesterday to Today
February 15, 2017 Oliver Kelley Farm Program Spaces
February 15, 2017 Oliver Kelley Farm Exhibit Trail
February 15, 2017 Spring on the Oliver Kelley Farm
February 15, 2017 Summer on the Oliver Kelley Farm
February 15, 2017 Fall & Winter on the Oliver Kelley Farm
February 15, 2017 Oliver Kelley Farm Field Trips
February 15, 2017 How to Visit Oliver Kelley Farm
February 15, 2017 Oliver Kelley Farm Brief History
February 15, 2017 Oliver Kelley Farm Funding & Partners
November 5, 2014 Toy Making Workshop and Christmas on the Farm Offered in December at Oliver Kelley Farm in Elk River
October 8, 2014 Build a Bird Feeder and Celebrate Thanksgiving this November at the Oliver H. Kelley Farm
September 3, 2014 Participate in the Fall Harvest at Oliver H. Kelley Farm this October
August 6, 2014 Full-Day Workshop Teaches Ox Driving Skills at Oliver H. Kelley Farm Sept. 20
July 2, 2014 Working with Oxen, Pickling and Threshing Offered this August at the Kelley Farm
June 11, 2014 Independence Day Celebrations and Grandparents Day at the Kelley Farm in July
May 21, 2014 Governor Signs Legislation to Fund Historic Kelley Farm
May 7, 2014 Spend June at the Kelley Farm with Baby Animals and a Father's Day Celebration
March 26, 2014 May Brings Baby Animals and Spring Planting to the Oliver H. Kelley Farm
March 5, 2014 Build a Birdhouse, Learn to Drive Oxen at Kelley Farm in April
February 18, 2014 Kelley Farm: Lead Release
February 18, 2014 Kelley Farm: Brief History
February 18, 2014 Kelley Farm: Quick Facts
February 18, 2014 Kelley Farm: Plan Drawings
February 5, 2014 Start Spring Early with a Seed Exchange at Oliver Kelley Farm
November 6, 2013 Oliver H. Kelley Farm Hosts Toy Making Workshop and Christmas on the Farm in December
October 16, 2013 Build a Bird Feeder Workshop and A Yankee Thanksgiving at Oliver H. Kelley Farm in November
May 1, 2013 Meet the Animals, Celebrate Father's Day and Children's Day at the Oliver H. Kelley Farm in June
April 10, 2013 Kelley Farm Kicks Off the Summer Season with Opening Weekend, Mother's Day and Farm Animals
March 13, 2013 Learn how to Build a Birdhouse and Drive Oxen at the Oliver H. Kelley Farm
February 13, 2013 Learn Seed Saving and Winter Gardening Techniques at the Oliver H. Kelley Farm in March
May 15, 2012 200 Volunteers From Honeywell, Robbinsdale Cooper High School to Make Enhancements to Historic Oliver H. Kelley Farm
April 7, 2008 AGRICULTURE COMMISSIONER TO SINK FIRST PLOW AT OLIVER KELLEY FARM
Oliver Kelley Farm Images