New Artist-In-Residence Program Connects American Indian Artists with Traditional Techniques, Call for Artists Announced

For immediate release

Release dated: 
April 29, 2014
Media contacts: 

Jessica Kohen, Marketing and Communications, 651-259-3148, jessica.kohen@mnhs.org

New Artist-In-Residence Program Connects American Indian Artists with Traditional Techniques, Call for Artists Announced

The Minnesota Historical Society is pleased to announce a new artist-in-residence program designed to revive the study of technique, knowledge and lifeways associated with traditional forms of American Indian artistry. Five American Indian artists will be selected to serve six-month paid residencies with MNHS beginning in spring 2014.

"Through this artist-in-residence program the MNHS collections can serve as a resource for native communities to share cultural practices among generations," said Steve Elliott, director and CEO. "The result will be invaluable to the preservation and vitality of American Indian art."

Bandolier historic Bandolier

(Left: Bandolier bag, late 1800s. Ojibwa, unknown maker. Right: Bandolier bag, 2003. “Fall Leaves” by Ivy (Norcross) Ailport and her husband Harry Ailport, Ogema, Minn. Ivy was a member of the Bear Clan of Ojibwa and an enrolled member of Gaa-waabaabiganikaag Anishinaabeg or the White Earth Nation.)

Each artist will have access to the MNHS collections and will be able to explore collections housed in other institutions. Inspired by their findings, the artists will develop community-based projects in order to share their knowledge with their home communities. MNHS will also gain new insight from the artists about the artifacts, information that can be shared with future generations of museum visitors.

The application process is now open for artists currently residing in Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Dakota and South Dakota; interested artists can find out more at www.mnhs.org/residencies.

The Native American Artist-in-Residence program is made possible in part by a grant from Margaret A. Cargill Foundation.

The Minnesota Historical Society is a non-profit educational and cultural institution established in 1849. MNHS collects, preserves and tells the story of Minnesota’s past through museum exhibits, libraries and collections, historic sites, educational programs and book publishing. Using the power of history to transform lives, MNHS preserves our past, shares our state’s stories and connects people with history.