March Events, Classes and Exhibits

For immediate release

Release dated: 
January 14, 2015
Media contacts: 

Megan Lawson • Marketing and Communications • 651-259-3141 • megan.lawson@mnhs.org

Jessica Kohen • Marketing and Communications • 651-259-3148 • jessica.kohen@mnhs.org

March Events, Classes and Exhibits

March 2015
Events, Classes and Exhibits

Tuesday, March 3

History of Hip: Bikes
Bedlam Theatre 213 4th St E, St Paul
St. Paul has a committed culture of cyclists. From its 1890s “scorchers” and early bicycle trails to its modern day entrepreneurs crafting everything from frames to gear and tools, this city is on a roll when it comes to liberating its citizens from the automobile. Jean McElvain, curator of the Goldstein Gallery’s current exhibit “Design Cycles: A Bike Show” shares some of her favorite bike stories, while Matt Reicher, author of the “Streets of Saint Paul” blog shares his research on some of the earliest bikers and bike stories in the city.
Phone:651-259-3015
Time:7:30 to 9 p.m.
Fee:$15/$12 MNHS and Bedlam members.
Reservations:recommended; call 651-259-3015 or register online

Educator's Preview: We Are Hmong Minnesota
Minnesota History Center 345 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul
Join us for a free educators’ preview of our new exhibit, “We Are Hmong Minnesota,” developed in partnership with the Hmong community of Minnesota. This is their story, told in their voices. Be the first to tour the exhibit and experience the profound impact the Hmong have had on their adopted homeland in the last forty years. Get hints on enhancing your students’ field trip experience and ideas to take back to the classroom. Participants will receive a gift bag, prize giveaways and a 10-percent discount in the History Center stores.
Phone:651-259-3000
Time:3 to 7 p.m.
Fee:Free
Reservations:required; call 651-259-3402 or register online

Thursday, March 5

History After Hours: Paul Bunyan and Other MN "Don't cha Know!" Tall Tales Charles A. Lindbergh Historic Site 1620 Lindbergh Dr. S., Little Falls
Think you know every tall tale about Minnesota's own Paul Bunyan? Come hear a new spin on why Paul and Babe are truly Minnesotan, as presented by Mary Schmidt, communications professor at St. Cloud Technical College. Test your knowledge and challenge your friends on other Minnesota folklore. The program begins with a cocktail social at 6:30. Admission includes 2 drink tickets (white wine), desserts, coffee and tea. This program is for people 21 years and older.
Phone:320-616-5421
Time:6:30 p.m. social, 7 p.m. program
Fee:$20/$17 for MNHS members.
Reservations:required; call 651-259-3015 or register online

Saturday, March 7

Time Capsule for Families: New House, 1872
Alexander Ramsey House 265 S. Exchange St., St. Paul
1872 was an exciting year for the Ramsey family as they moved into their new mansion home in St. Paul. Discover what other events made 1872 so important for the Ramseys in this one hour children's program. Use a timeline map to explore the Ramsey House and collect time capsule tokens along the way. Learn about the new foods and inventions which made life easier. Children can create their own time capsule to take home.
Phone:651-296-8760
Time:Noon, 12:30 and 1 p.m.
Fee:$10 adults, $9 seniors and college students, $7 children ages 6-17; free for children age 5 and under and MNHS members.
Reservations:required; call 651-259-3015 or register online

Basket Weaving Workshop
Forest History Center 2609 County Road 76, Grand Rapids
Local basket weaver Teresa Sills will lead a one-day workshop in the fine art of basket making. Students will enjoy the small class size and take home a wonderful handmade basket that is sure to become a family heirloom.
Phone:218-327-4482
Time:10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Fee:$45/$35 for MNHS members.
Reservations:required; call 218-327-4482

Washburn A Mill Tour
Mill City Museum 704 South Second Street, Minneapolis
Take an in-depth look at the historic Washburn A Mill complex and the award-winning Mill City Museum building. A museum interpreter will take visitors into the building’s many nooks and crannies, highlighting the lives of the men and women who worked there, how the building functioned during its peak flour milling years and the many changes to the building over time. This is the only opportunity for a guided tour through the entire museum building and the only chance to see some of its non-public spaces. The tour includes admission to the museum gallery, Baking Lab, Water Lab and Flour Tower show.
Phone:612-341-7555
Time:1 p.m.
Fee:$14 adults, $12 seniors and college students, $10 children ages 6-17 and MNHS members. Tour includes museum admission.
Reservations:required; call 612-341-7555or register online
AlsoMarch 28

Kids' Crafts: Story Book Time and Cornhusk Dolls
Mille Lacs Indian Museum and Trading Post 43411 Oodena Dr., Onamia
Enjoy stories and light snacks from noon to 1 p.m., then from 1 to 3 p.m. children can learn how to make a cornhusk doll to take home. Cornhusk dolls were traditionally made during the fall out of the outer covering of an ear of corn. Materials and an instructional handout are included. Please allow an hour to make the craft. This project is recommended for children ages 10 and up.
Phone:320-532-3632
Time:Noon to 3 p.m.
Fee:$6 per kit (museum admission not included).

We Are Hmong Minnesota Family Day and Exhibit Opening
Minnesota History Center 345 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul
Experience the journey the Hmong took from Southeast Asia to their new homeland in Minnesota four decades ago at the opening of the new History Center exhibit "We Are Hmong Minnesota," on view March 7-Nov. 29. Celebrate the contributions of this vital and active community with music and dance performances, displays, fashion, games, demonstrations and multi-generational hands-on activities.
Phone:651-259-3000
Time:11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Fee:Free.

Sunday, March 8

Seed Savers Exchange
Oliver H. Kelley Farm 15788 Kelley Farm Rd., Elk River
The Kelley Farm has promoted the saving of rare and heirloom seed since 1981. This free visitor center program includes a presentation on how to save, store and plant seeds, then save them again, just as farmers and gardeners have done for thousands of years. A gardening expert will share insight into heirloom plants for the first part of the event. Then stay for the free seed exchange. Participants do not need to bring seeds in order to take seeds home. Seed art and sorting activities will be provided for children. Refreshments will be served.
Phone:763-441-6896
Time:2 to 4 p.m.
Fee:Free

Tuesday, March 10

History Film Series: Gettysburg – An American Story
Charles A. Lindbergh Historic Site 1620 Lindbergh Dr. S., Little Falls
Formerly called "Hush", "Gettysburg - An American Story" is a documentary that follows the First Minnesota's journey through the Civil War into the deciding battles of the historic conflict and asks: What did the brave men and women fight for and why is it still relevant to American politics and society today? The film starts at 7 p.m. The museum and gift shop will be open for a short time before and after the film screening.
Phone:320-616-5421
Time:7 p.m.
Fee:Free

Seniors in Mind: Behind the Scenes of We Are Hmong Minnesota
Minnesota History Center 345 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul
Commemorating the 40th anniversary of Hmong migration to the state, the exhibit "We Are Hmong Minnesota" represents an unprecedented partnership between the Hmong community and the Minnesota Historical Society. In addition to the exhibit, this partnership has resulted in a companion Hmong textile display at the James J. Hill House, public programs, acquisitions of artifacts, school outreach and a new Hmong resources page on the MNHS website. Co-curators Noah Vang and Brian Horrigan will speak about the partnership that produced this extraordinary initiative.
Phone:651-259-3000
Time:10:30 a.m.
Fee:$2. Does not include $9 senior admission to the History Center.
Reservations:recommended; call 651-259-3015 or register online

Thursday, March 12

World War II History Roundtable: The Logistics of War: Beans and Bullets to the Soldiers
Historic Fort Snelling 200 Tower Avenue, St. Paul
Dr. Jerry Brown, Professor of History at US Army CGSC, and combat veterans of Supply Operations will show the importance of logistical operations in winning wars. The Harold C. Deutsch World War II History Roundtable brings together authors, historians and WWII veterans to discuss the history of the conflict and to share the stories of those who lived through it. The series is presented the second Thursday of each month from September through May (some exceptions may occur).
Phone:612-726-1171
Time:7 p.m.
Fee:$5, free for students.

Minnesota’s Own: Preserving Our Grand Homes, with author Larry Millett
Mill City Museum 704 South Second Street, Minneapolis
Join author Larry Millett for an illustrated presentation based on his new book "Minnesota’s Own: Preserving Our Grand Homes." From Duluth to Bemidji, Red Wing to the Twin Cities, Millett and photographer Matt Schmitt look at homes from across the state that have been lovingly preserved and saved so that they can remain jewels among the state’s living architecture. Mr. Millett will sign copies of the book which can be purchased in the Mill City Museum store.
Phone:612-341-7555
Time:7 p.m.
Fee:Free

Friday, March 13

Ramsey After Dark: Victorian Superstitions
Alexander Ramsey House 265 S. Exchange St., St. Paul
Superstitions were a part of Victorian society, from wedding cakes and dating customs, to séances and spirit writing. Explore the mysterious and unique world of Victorian superstitions in this 75 minute program. Hear excerpts from Ramsey family journals and play Victorian fortune telling games in the parlor. Discover how and why superstitions captured the Victorian imagination.
Phone:651-296-8760
Time:7 and 8:30 p.m.
Fee:$10 adults, $9 seniors and college students, $7 children ages 6-17; $2 discount for MNHS members.
Reservations:required; call 651-259-3015 or register online

Saturday, March 14

Irish Heritage at the Hill House
James J. Hill House 240 Summit Ave., St. Paul
Mary Theresa Mehegan's parents came from Ireland to the United States and eventually settled in St. Paul in 1850. At the age of 21, Mary wed James Jerome Hill, a young Canadian immigrant of Scotch-Irish stock, who achieved success with the Great Northern Railway. Though proudly American, the Hill family retained their Irish values and culture through their love of traditional Irish music as well as women’s needlepoint and lace-making. Theme tours will include favorite Irish songs, organ music and needlework demonstrations. Stories of the Hills and their servants (many of them Irish) will engage visitors in the history of Irish-Americans in Minnesota.
Phone:651-297-2555
Time:10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday; 1 to 3:30 p.m. Sunday
Fee:Tours: $9 adults, $7 seniors and college students, $6 children ages 6-17; free for children age 5 and under and MNHS members.
Reservations:recommended; call 651-297-2555
AlsoMarch 15

Women of Mill City Family Day
Mill City Museum 704 South Second Street, Minneapolis
Celebrate Women’s History Month with performances by four Mill City Museum History Players portraying women in Minneapolis and the region in the 19th and 20th centuries. Guests can also take a short quiz to discover which "women’s work" would suit them best, and try their hand at the "Piecework Challenge," testing their speed against 19th century work standards.
Phone:612-341-7555
Time:Noon to 4 p.m.
Fee:Programs included with museum admission of $11 adults, $9 seniors and college students, $6 children ages 6-17; free for MNHS members.

Topics on Family History: Adding Women to the Family Tree
Minnesota Historical Society Library 345 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul
Locating female ancestors to add to a family tree can be challenging. Learn to look at the whole family for clues on how to solve research problems. The class is taught by Alice Eichholz, Ph.D., CG. Eicholz is a professional genealogist, author and professor at Walden University.
Phone:651-259-3300
Time:10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Fee:$32/$28 MNHS and MGS members.
Reservations:required; call 651-259-3015 or register online

History Forum: Wounded Knee: Party Politics and the Road to a Massacre
Minnesota History Center 345 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul
On Dec. 29, 1890, as Democrats and Republicans battled for political power in Washington, a U.S. cavalry regiment hunted down and killed innocent Lakota men, women and children in the Wounded Knee Massacre. Heather Cox Richardson, of Boston University, will reveal how a mix of partisan politics, economics and rhetoric in Washington sparked the deadly events at Wounded Knee, and explore how the massacre illuminates the dangers of American political polarization, both in 1890 and today. This program is made possible by the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund through the vote of Minnesotans on November 4, 2008. Additional support is provided by the Maurice Stans Fund and the Lindbergh Foundation.
Phone:651-259-3000
Time:10 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Fee:$15/$11 MNHS members.
Reservations:required; call 651-259-3015 or register online

Sample Saturdays
Minnesota History Center 345 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul
Today’s brewers and distillers draw on fresh ingredients and rich traditions to make tasty beers and beverages for the modern Minnesotan palate. Take a break in Café Minnesota and sample an adult beverage or a tasty locally made soda and chat with an artisan. While supplies last.
Phone:651-259-3000
Time:1 to 4 p.m.
Fee:$5

Capitol Re-Construction Tour
Minnesota State Capitol 75 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., St. Paul
The Minnesota State Capitol building, completed in 1905, is undergoing important repair and restoration work and needed improvements. Get an in-depth look at the history of its original construction and current information on the work being done to save this architectural treasure for generations to come. Guided tours run 60 to 90 minutes.
Phone:651-296-2881
Time:11 a.m.
Fee:$9 adults, $8 seniors and college students, $6 children ages 6-17; $2 discount for MNHS members.
Reservations:required; call 651-296-2881 or register online

Friday, March 20

The Clairvoyant Fox Sisters
Alexander Ramsey House 265 S. Exchange St., St. Paul
In the spring of 1848, two young sisters in a remote New York town became famous when reports surfaced that they were able to communicate with the spirit of a dead man. What followed next for Kate and Maggie Fox was fame, fortune, and ultimately, ruin. Join educator and photographer Nathan Lewis for this presentation on spiritualism in the mid-19th century. Discover the story of America's most infamous clairvoyants, the Fox Sisters, and learn how they influenced a nation.
Phone:651-296-8760
Time:7 p.m.
Fee:$9 adults, $8 seniors and college students; $2 discount for MNHS members.
Reservations:required; call 651-259-3015 or register online

Saturday, March 21

Maple Syrup Family Day
Forest History Center 2609 County Road 76, Grand Rapids
Learn about maple syrup—a sweet treat with a long history in North America. See how sugar maples are tapped and the sap is boiled down to make syrup. Taste maple jack and hard maple candies, maple syrup candied popcorn, and help make ice cream and then top it with maple syrup. Maple syrup products will be for sale in the gift shop.
Phone:218-327-4482
Time:10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Fee:$9 adults, $7 seniors and college students, $6 children ages 6 to 17; free for children age 5 and under and MNHS members.

Baking Memories: The Rise of Convenience Foods
Mill City Museum 704 South Second Street, Minneapolis
The postwar years of the late 1940s and 1950s ushered in a new era of kitchen conveniences. Did housewives want these easy-to-use products and appliances or were food companies creating a market for their goods by exaggerating the drudgery of home cooking? Using the example of the cake mix, this demonstration will answer this question, highlighting the dramatic changes in cooking habits during this era and how those innovations affect our lives today. Visitors will learn about food history, sample cakes made from scratch and from mix and take home a recipe.
Phone:612-341-7555
Time:2 p.m.
Fee:Programs included with museum admission of $11 adults, $9 seniors and college students, $6 children ages 6-17; free for MNHS members.

Maple Sap, Sugar and Syrup Demonstration
Mille Lacs Indian Museum and Trading Post 43411 Oodena Dr., Onamia
Join museum staff for a demonstration about traditional and contemporary methods for harvesting and processing maple sap. Guests will observe the process of gathering maple sap and boiling it into syrup and sugar. Samples of maple sugar will be available. Children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. In the event of bad weather, this event will be rescheduled to March 28.
Phone:320-532-3632
Time:Noon to 3 p.m.
Fee:$8 adults, $7 seniors and college students, $6 children ages 6-17; free for children age 5 and under and MNHS members.
Reservations:recommended; call 320-532-3632

Qhia Dab Neeg: Hmong Stories on Film
Minnesota History Center 345 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul
Qhia Dab Neeg is Hmong for “storytelling.” The Qhia Dab Neeg Film Festival, held annually in St. Paul, is a way members of the Hmong community are using film to tell their stories in their own voices. View a selection of short documentary and narrative films from the first five years of the festival at the Minnesota History Center. The films tell diverse stories of war and loss, tradition and change, and new identities forged in the crucible of a new home—the United States. The selection was curated by festival founder and coordinator Kao Chou Vue. Many of the filmmakers will be present for post-screening discussions.
Phone:651-259-3000
Time:10 to 11:30 a.m. and 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Fee:Free

Tuesday, March 24

History Lounge: Stassen Again
Minnesota History Center 345 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul
Harold Stassen lived a personal and political life that was far more complex than many know. He served as Minnesota Governor from 1939 to 1943, co-authored the United Nations charter, was a member of the Eisenhower administration, and ran for the U.S. Presidency ten times. All the while he consistently argued for moderation, tolerance and common sense at a time when America, and the world, was in woefully short supply of each. Steve Werle, author of the new biography "Stassen Again" (MNHS Press, March 2015) will examine the rich legacy of this famous, but often misunderstood Minnesota politician and statesman.
Phone:651-259-3000
Time:7 p.m.
Fee:Free

Thursday, March 26

History Happy Hour: Graffiti
Alexander Ramsey House 265 S. Exchange St., St. Paul
Have a drink with your friends at the Ramsey House while you learn about historic graffiti. Alyssa Auten, Director of the Nicollet County Historical Society, will share examples of historic carved graffiti from Minnesota and beyond, and discuss whether and how to protect these signs of life in historic buildings. This program is for people 21 years and older. Admission includes 2 drinks, snacks, presentation and time to mingle in the mansion.
Phone:651-296-8760
Time:5:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Fee:$25/$20 for MNHS members.
Reservations:required; call 651-259-3015 or register online

World War II History Roundtable: Return to the Philippines: The Road to Japan
Historic Fort Snelling 200 Tower Avenue, St. Paul
Dr. Nathan Prefer, author of "Leyte," and combat veterans of the Leyte Campaign will discuss the command controversy and tactical operations of General MacArthur's return. The Harold C. Deutsch World War II History Roundtable brings together authors, historians and WWII veterans to discuss the history of the conflict and to share the stories of those who lived through it. The series is presented the second Thursday of each month from September through May (some exceptions may occur).
Phone:612-726-1171
Time:7 p.m.
Fee:$5, free for students.

Saturday, March 28

Sweetgrass Basket Workshop
Mille Lacs Indian Museum and Trading Post 43411 Oodena Dr., Onamia
Learn the art of making a coil sweetgrass basket in this two-day workshop. Sweetgrass is a fragrant sacred herb used in ceremonies and artwork by the Ojibwe. Refreshments and a light lunch will be provided on both days. A minimum of 5 participants is required. Children under age 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Registration is required 3 days prior to workshop. Discount hotel rooms are available at Grand Casino Mille Lacs on Saturday night for all workshop participants.
Phone:320-532-3632
Time:Noon to 4 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday
Fee:$60/$55 for MNHS members; Additional supply fee of $15.
Reservations:required; call 320-532-3632
AlsoMarch 29

Sunday, March 29

Victorian Wedding Traditions
Alexander Ramsey House 265 S. Exchange St., St. Paul
The wedding of Marion Ramsey to Charles Furness on March 29, 1875 was one of St. Paul's most prestigious events. This 75 minute program explores the behind-the-scenes drama of the event: from the lavish gifts the couple received to the wedding dress fiasco which almost ruined the big day. Learn about Victorian wedding traditions, enjoy wedding cake and view some of the gifts the couple received, which are part of the Minnesota Historical Society's collections.
Phone:651-296-8760
Time:2, 2:30 and 3 p.m.
Fee:$12 adults, $11 seniors and college students, $9 ages 6-17; $2 discount for MNHS members.
Reservations:required; call 651-259-3015 or register online

Baking Memories: Pillsbury Bake-Off Through the Years
Mill City Museum 704 South Second Street, Minneapolis
See how history is revealed in a demonstration of Chocolate Cherry Bars, a Bake-Off winning recipe from 1974. Learn about the 60-year history of the Pillsbury Bake-Off, sample treats, get baking tips and take home a copy of the recipe.
Phone: 612-341-7555
Time: 2 p.m.
Fee: Programs included with museum admission of $11 adults, $9 seniors and college students, $6 children ages 6-17; free for MNHS members.

Ongoing Exhibits

Minnesota History Center
345 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul

Opening March 7, 2015

We Are Hmong Minnesota
November 2015 marks the 40th anniversary of the Hmong migration to Minnesota following the war in Southeast Asia. Today, the Twin Cities metro area is home to 66,000 Hmong, the largest urban Hmong population in the United States. Developed in partnership with the Hmong community, the new exhibit "We Are Hmong Minnesota," will debut March 7-Nov. 29, 2015 at the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul. The exhibit will commemorate the anniversary and celebrate the significant political, social and economic contributions the Hmong have made to Minnesota and the nation. For more information visit www.minnesotahistorycenter.org/exhibits.

Through April 26, 2015

Modern Spirit: The Art of George Morrison
The first comprehensive retrospective of a key Native American modernist, Modern Spirit: The Art of George Morrison includes drawings, paintings, prints, and sculpture that bring together concepts of abstraction, landscape, and spiritual reflection in the mind and eye of this important 20th-century artist. Half of the 80 works in the exhibition issue from the largest and most important collection of Morrison’s artwork in the country, the Minnesota Museum of American Art in St. Paul. The other 40 stem from important public and private collections from across the country including four pieces from the collection of the Minnesota Historical Society. The exhibition is curated by W. Jackson Rushing III, Adkins Presidential Professor of Art History and Mary Lou Milner Carver Chair in Native American Art at the University of Oklahoma. Rushing’s teaching and scholarship explore the interstitial zone between (Native) American studies, anthropology, and art history. For more information visit www.minnesotahistorycenter.org/exhibits.

Ongoing

Then Now Wow
Designed primarily for children, visitors of all ages will enjoy exploring Minnesota’s distinctive places from the prairies and forests to the cities. Along the way they'll meet the people who have made their homes here. Step inside a prairie sod house; board a Twin Cities streetcar; don a headlamp to venture underground in an Iron Range mine; hitch a ride on a boxcar; sit in a modern tipi; and encounter artifacts and images unique to Minnesota’s diverse people and historic events. “Then Now Wow” is made possible by the Legacy Amendment's Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund through the vote of Minnesotans on Nov. 4, 2008. For more information visit www.minnesotahistorycenter.org/thennowwow.

Ongoing

Minnesota’s Greatest Generation: The Depression, The War, The Boom
Explore interactive displays and innovative multimedia experiences that reveal the lives and stories of the men and women who came of age during the Depression and World War II and went on to create the postwar “boom.” The exhibition relies substantially on first-person narratives drawn from oral history interviews, published memoirs, reminiscences and letters. For more information visit www.mngreatestgeneration.org.

Ongoing

Open House: If These Walls Could Talk
This interactive exhibit uses a single, existing house in the Railroad Island neighborhood on St. Paul’s East Side as a window into the daily lives of people of the past. Stories of families, from the German immigrants who built the home through the Italians, African Americans and Hmong who succeeded them, are told through rooms representing different eras of the house. For more information visit www.minnesotahistorycenter.org/openhouse.

Ongoing

Weather Permitting
Minnesotans learn to cope with extreme temperatures, watch for signs of storms and generally enjoy the outdoors, whether boating on a summer’s day, skiing down a hill or snowmobiling across snowdrifts. Visit the multi-media tornado exhibit, “Get to the Basement,” named the best museum exhibit in the Twin Cities by City Pages. For more information visit www.mnhs.org/weather.

James J. Hill House
240 Summit Ave., St. Paul

Closes
March 22, 2015

Minnesota Modern: Four Artists of the Twentieth Century
As Minnesota approached the mid-century mark after World War II, the Twin Cities enjoyed a thriving community of talented and successful visual artists. Among them, four individuals stood out: Dewey Albinson (1898-1971), Cameron Booth (1892-1980), Clement Haupers (1900-1982) and Elof Wedin (1901-1983). These artists dominated the art scene in Minnesota for decades. Through their lengthy careers and enormous output, each artist contributed a great deal to bring modernism to the state. The artists are represented with paintings and prints drawn from the Minnesota Historical Society’s permanent collection. Minnesota Modern is presented in conjunction with the release of a publication of the same name by Afton Press.