Letter to Knute Nelson from A.H. Vernon - April 9, 1917

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Letter to Knute Nelson from A.H. Vernon - April 9, 1917

By: Lori Williamson | WW1 Daybook | April 9, 2017


Just days after President Wilson asks Congress to declare war with Germany, Little Falls lawyer A.H. Vernon writes Senator Knute Nelson for a recommendation to be appointed as an officer in the army. Also referring Mark Buckman, Vernon describes that his qualifications as a political reporter for the Pioneer Press and a practicing lawyer. He describes Buckman as having more practical skills in mechanics and pharmacology. However, Vernon’s main reason for requesting a position in the army is for integrity’s sake. He explains that he feels he can be an example, “as [he] has done a good deal of patriotic talking, and [doesn’t] believe talk without action amounts to very much if a fellow is at an age where he can do some active work.”
 

 

 

Partial Transcription:

April 9, 1917

Hon. Knute Nelson,
U.S. Senate,
Washington, D.C.
My Dear Senator:-
Since writing you regarding the military training camps for civilians, I see by the papers that on account of the war they will be discontinued, and training camps for reserve officers held instead. I therefore thought I would make application for a comission as reserve officer, and would write to see what is the proper procedure. [...] I don't know what the situation is , and while it will be a great sacrifice for me to close up shop here, as I have just got my practice well established, I feel that I should do so, and that the example would be worth something, as I have done a good deal of patriotic talking, and don't believe talk without action amounts to very much if a fellow is at an age where he can do some active work. [...]
Yours sincerely,
A.H. Vernon
 

Citation:

Knute Nelson Papers, 1861-1924