Francis D. Millet, The Treaty of Traverse des Sioux, July 1851
Francis D. Millet, The Treaty of Traverse des Sioux, July 1851

Because the Dakota received only the interest, they never got the full cash benefit of the treaty. The land ceded by the Dakota for about 7.5 cents an acre was resold to settlers at $1.25 per acre--more than 15 times what the U.S. government had paid for it. The Dakota expressed their dissatisfaction with the treaty and how it was implemented.

"Fathers, you think it a great deal you are giving for this country. I don't think so; for both our lands and all we get for them will at last belong to the white men. The money comes to us, but will all go to the white men who trade with us."

Opiyahedaya (Curly Head), 1851

"You can take the money back. We sold our land to you, and you promised to pay us. If you don't give us the money, I will be glad, and all our people will be glad, for we will have our land back."

Mazasha (Red Iron), 1852