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Abolition

Title: Newspaper Editorial
Type: Newspaper
Date: 1860
Source: Falls Evening News

Description: In this short notice, the editors of the newspaper explained their reasons for not publishing all of the letters they received about the Eliza Winston case.

Transcription:

THE SLAVE CASE.—The all absorbing topic for the week has been the slave case at Lake Harriet. If we were to attempt to give all the stories afloat on the one side and the other, we should crowd out columns. We have talked with men of all parties, and all shades of opinion, and belief, we have taken a moderate position when eliciting the views of those who were violent upon either side, and our conviction is that by far the larger porportion of our thinking people will soon settle into the conviction that the thing done was right. The judgment of the mode of carrying it into effect will vary with the temperament, and personal convictions and we may add the personal relations of each individual.

We shall not attempt to give the thousand stories that are current, as we understand those concerned in the release of the woman, are preparing a particular statement for publication. We have also understood that the fact averred by the other party will be published.

Meantime let us hold firmly to our principles, neither cringing with a servile or a mercenary spirit to Southerners who are among us, nor on the other hand imitating that violence we so constantly and with so much reason condemn in the citizens of the South, towards those among them who are "suspected" of being hostile to their institution. Not retaliation, but dignity and firmness, are essential to manliness.