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John Pillsbury

Title: Article About Pillsbury's Inauguration
Type: Newspaper
Date: January 1876
Source: St. Paul Daily Pioneer Press

Description: This article appeared in the St. Paul Daily Pioneer Press to describe the speech that Governor Pillsbury presented upon taking office.

Transcription:

The Inaugural A speech given by a new Governor. Message of Governor Pillsbury will be read with universal interest for our readers will expect to see the characteristic good sense and the sound practical judgment of the man exhibited to his first ethical deliverance: Speech about his values. and they will not be disappointed. As might have been expected, the subject which first engages his attention is that which for so many years has been the chief subject of his solicitude Care and attention. as chairman of the senate committee on finance. He urges strongly a greater economy and retrenchment Cut back. in our public expenditures, Government expenses. and as a practical means to that end urges that the sessions of the legislature be contracted Reduced. to forty days, and that the public printing be curtailed by the exclusion from public reports of tabulated and minute Small details. details, the abolition of the adjutant general's office A chief administrative officer and staff. or the reduction of his salary, and the reduction of the number of the two legislative bodies. He opposes the merging of the office of insurance and railroad commissioner, and recommends that the latter office be abolished unless made more useful by the enlargement of its duties.